Tag Archives: whole food

Fast Facts about Pro Vitality

Pro Vitality is Based in Nature and Backed By Science

Based in Nature—Whole Food, Human Food Chain Nutrients

GNLD Pro Vitality supplements provide the finest natural nutrients from whole grains, fruits and vegetables and fish to help you achieve optimal health.*

 

Backed by Science—Clinically Proven Formulas Assure Effectiveness

These nutrients are delivered in highly bio-efficient forms in exclusive, clinically proven formulas that maximize nutrient absorption, utilization and benefits by using the most advanced scientific methods and proprietary processes.*

 

TRE-EN-EN® GRAIN CONCENTRATES

Feed your cells—energize your life.*

Good nutrition begins at the cellular level. Tre-en-en is the world’s first and only whole grain lipids and sterols supplement proven to enhance energy and vitality by optimizing cell membrane function. It energizes your entire body by helping your cells function more efficiently.*

 

CAROTENOID COMPLEX

Protect your cells—optimize your immunity.*

With the protective power of carotenoids from carrots, tomatoes, spinach, red bell peppers, peaches, strawberries and apricots, this patented formula is the result of over 10 years of research and development. Carotenoid Complex is the world’s first and only whole food supplement clinically proven by USDA researchers to protect your heart, defend your cells, and boost your immune power.*

 

OMEGA-III SALMON OIL PLUS

Balance and regulate your cells—maximize your good health.*

The world’s first complete fish oil supplement with guaranteed potency of all eight members of the omega-3 family. Recent human clinical trials proved its bioavailability to support heart and cardiovascular health, as presented at Experimental Biology 2008. Plus, GNLD’s fish oil sources are screened for more than 160 potential contaminants with an allowable detection limit of zero, so they are guaranteed pure!*

 

 

www.BrewerNutrition.com


* This statement has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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We are facing a global health crisis!

Health surveys show that the incidence of chronic diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes is higher than ever before. This can be attributed largely to the state of our diets that are woefully inadequate in nutrient-rich whole foods.

 

The reality is that most of us have turned the healthy food pyramid upside down—too much of the wrong stuff, not enough of the right stuff!

• 90% of us don’t eat the recommended 5-13 servings of fruits and vegetables

• 70% of us admit to eating foods that actually contribute to poor health

• Less than 1 serving of whole grains are consumed on a daily basis—many don’t even get that

• Protective lipids and sterols have been stripped from whole grains to increase their shelf life

• Many don’t eat fish due to concerns about the presence of heavy metals and contaminants

 

TURN YOUR WELLNESS PYRAMID RIGHT SIDE UP!

• Leading global health authorities like the World Health Organization, Centers for Disease Control, and American Heart Association agree that good nutrition plays a critical role in lowering the risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes.

 • Everyone should increase consumption of whole-grain foods, fruits and vegetables, and foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids— and maintain a healthy weight.

 • But even those with good intentions to eat a healthy diet face challenges. Busy lifestyles, eating on-the-run, and the prevalence of processed foods all contribute towards nutritional gaps that would benefit from nutritional supplements.

 

GNLD’S SOLUTION: PRO VITALITY

• Whole-food nutrition clinically proven to strengthen the perfect foundation for lifelong health and vitality

• In convenient on-the-go packets

• Includes three scientifically-proven products: Tre-en-en, Carotenoid Complex, and Omega-III Salmon Oil Plus, providing key nutrients from whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and fish.

• Each packet provides powerful nutrients that support*:

o Cellular health for abundant energy

o Powerful antioxidant protection

o Optimum immune strength

o Heart and brain health

o Flexible, healthy joints

o Youthful skin, hair and nails

• Pro Vitality’s whole-food nutrition is the core supplement for healthy nutrition—no matter what your health goals!

 

www.BrewerNutrition.com

Carotenoid Complex

Protect your cells – Carotenoid Complex

Background: Carotenoids first took center-stage as protector nutrients in the mid 1970’s when researchers at the US Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) identified their role in reducing the risk of disease25. National Cancer Institute researcher Regina Ziegler went on to reveal its connection to lung cancer prevention in 198626, and then showed a lower risk of cancer in those with the highest dietary intake of fruit and vegetable-derived carotenoids27,28. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and other studies at the time found carotenoids also functioned in heart health and reduced the risk of heart disease29,30. Proof of benefit soon expanded to include eye health and visual acuity31 and immune function32.

GNLD Research: Research conducted on GNLD’s Carotenoid Complex has spanned more than 15 years. It started with the first ever proof of bioavailability of whole food-derived carotenoids33,34. USDA researchers went on to reaffirm its bioavailability and then demonstrated its cardio-protective35,36 and cellular protective powers37. This was followed by two more studies conducted by the USDA researchers showing Carotenoid Complex’s beneficial effects on immune capacity38,39. In 2001, GNLD researchers reaffirmed bioavailability across an even broader spectrum of dietary carotenoids40.

Latest Findings: Evidence supporting the importance of carotenoid intake for health benefits continues to mount. Concern by leading health authorities over insufficient carotenoid consumption has resulted in campaigns to increase awareness for higher levels of carotenoid intake41,42.

Heart and cardiovascular health: A 2004 study conducted by a team at the Harvard Medical School found that men in the top quintile with higher levels of serum carotenoids (including alphacarotene, beta-carotene, lycopene, lutein, and beta-cryptoxanthin) had a 40% decreased risk of ischemic stroke than those with the lowest serum levels.43 Similarly, a 2008 study of 559 men showed that increased intake of alpha and beta carotene from carrots equated to a 17% reduction in risk of cardiovascular (CVD) death.44 Swedish researchers in 2006 correlated consistently lower levels of the carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin, and beta cryptoxanthin with coronary artery disease occurrence. The healthy controls had significantly higher levels of these carotenoids in their blood45.

Prostate health: Since the early nineties, scientific research has reported a connection between the carotenoid Lycopene and prostate cancer risk reduction. One study showed that Lycopene (from tomatoes) present in the diet 4 to 5 times per week, attributed to a 25% reduction in prostate cancer risk. The 2-year study found that an 82% increase in blood Lycopene levels corresponded with a 42% decrease in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels46.

Immune health: Swedish researchers in 2001 observed higher levels of natural killer cells (NK cells) in people with higher levels of these carotenoids, confirming the relationship between dietary carotenoid intake, immune capacity and health.

Vision health: In a 48-week intervention trial, researchers tested Lutein supplementation for vision protective-function in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). They concluded: “Comparing the development of vision measures against the natural loss expected to occur over the course of the 48 weeks, most measures showed reduced decline, and these reductions were significant for normal illumination”47.

Mental performance: A2007 French study48 showed a connection between carotenoids and cognitive performance in a healthy elderly population. Study author Tasnime Akbaraly states “In this study, low levels of specific plasma carotenoids (lycopene and zeaxanthin) were associated to poor cognitive functioning in a highly educated, community-dwelling elderly population”.

Inflammatory health: A 2005 UK study by Cambridge University49 researchers showed that study subjects with the highest (top one third) daily intake of beta-cryptoxanthin had only about one-half the risk of developing polyarthritis than those in the bottom one-third. Researchers commented that even modest increases in beta-cryptoxanthin intake were associated with a significantly reduced risk of developing inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Pro Vitality Nutrition – Whole Food Nutrition for Lifelong Health and Vitality… in convenient, on-the-go packets

In my next post, we will look at another GNLD product that can help solve this health crisis:

Omega-III Salmon Oil Plus – Balance & Regulate your cells

In my previous post, we looked at another GNLD product that can help solve this health crisis:

Tre-en-en Grain Concentrates – Feed your cells

Carotenoid Complex – Protect your cells

www.BrewerNutrition.com

References

25 http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhanes

26 Ziegler, R. G., et al; Carotenoid intake, vegetables, and the risk of lung cancer among white men in New Jersey; 1986, American Journal of Epidemiology, 123:1080-1093

27 Ziegler, R. G., A review of epidemiologic evidence that carotenoids reduce the risk of cancer. 1989. Journal of Nutrition. 119:116-122

28 Ziegler, R. G., Vegetables, Fruits, and carotenoids and the risk of cancer. 1991. Am. Jour. Clin. Nutr. 53:251S-259S

29 Verlangieri, A. J. et al; Fruit and vegetable consumption and cardiovascular disease mortality. 1985. Medical Hypothesis. 16:7-15

30 Rimm, E. B., et al: Dietary intake and risk of coronary heart disease in men. 1993, New England Journal of Medicine. 328:1450-1456

31 Knekt, P., et al; Serum antioxidant vitamins and risk of cataract. 1992. British Medical Journal. 305:1392-1394

32 Carotenoids in Human Health, 1993. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 691:61-67

33 Carughi, A. & Hooper, FG. Plasma carotenoid concentrations beore and after supplementation with a carotenoid mixture. 1993. Annals of the New York

Academy of Sciences. 691:244-245

34 Carughi, A., Hooper, FG.; Plasma carotenoids before and after supplementation with a carotenoid mixture; American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 1994; Volume 59, pages 896-9

35 Z Dixon, B Burri, J Erdman, et al ; Effects of a carotene-deficient diet on measures of oxidative susceptibility and superoxide dismutase activity in adult women;; Free Radical Biology & Medicine, Volume 17, Number 6, pages 537-44

36 Y Lin, B Burri, et al; Effects of low dietary carotene intake on oxidative susceptibility in women; FASEB Journal, Volume 10, Number 3, page A478, April 1996

37 Z Dixon, B Burri, et al; Effect of low carotene diet on malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration; FASEB Journal, Volume 10, Number 3, page A240, April 1996

38 T Kramer, B Burri, et al; Carotenoid-flavonoid modulated immune response in women; FASEB Journal, Volume 9, Number 3, page A170, April 1995

39 T Kramer, B Burri, et al; Modulated mitogenic proliferative responsiveness of lymphocytes in whole-blood culture after a low-carotene diet and mixed carotenoid supplementation in women; American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

1997, Volume 65, pages 871-5

40 Carughi, A., Omaye, S., Furst, A.; Plasma carotenoid response to supplementation of a mix of fruits and vegetables; Proceedings of Experimental Biology, March 31 – April 4, 2001

41 http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/5ADay/

42 http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/prevention-genetics-causes/prevention

43 Stroke. 2004; 35:1584-1588

44 2008, Journal of Nutrition: February, 138:344-350.

45 2006. Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Disease.Published on-line: doi: 10.1016/numecd.2006.02.006

46 Urological Oncology (vol. 23, pp. 383-385)

47 Ophthalmology (BMC Ophthalmology 2006, 6:23)

48 The Journal of Gerontology: Medical Science; 2007; 3:308-316